Bound: An Expatriates Journey to China and Beyond

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Bound: An Expatriates Journey to China and Beyond
04 October 2014, 4:30pm – 6:00pm
Venue: Rouge, Jalan Bisma, Ubud
Cost: Free

A Literary memoir explaining why expatriates choose to live and work in very different cultures to their own. Combining personal experience with interviews carried out in Shanghai and Hong Kong, Bound:An Expatriates Journey to China and Beyond was long-listed for the Proverse International Prize and for the 2014 Australian Book Review Calibre Prize. To be launched by Ian Burnet

Bound

Christine Lavender

Christine Lavender’s first doctorate was in education, and her second in creative writing. During her University teaching career she authored and edited two academic books and published articles in international refereed journals. She contributed to an anthology of creative writing, Relay in 2011. She was Academic Director of a design and business college in Shanghai, China and had an association with the city between 2002 and 2012. Her memoir Bound:An Expatriates Journey to China and Beyond emerged from these experiences. It breaks new ground in its focus on expatriates who by taking risks and, “turning to the foreign” attract both challenges and new opportunities.

Christine-Lavender


Ian Burnet

Ian Burnet has spent 30 years living, working and travelling in Indonesia. Fascinated by the diverse cultures and history of the archipelago, he believed the story of the tiny islands of Ternate and Tidore and their effect on world history needed to be told. His book Spice Islands (2011) tells the history, romance and adventure of the spice trade over 2000 years. It has received critical acclaim and has been described as “a wonderful book – a triumph of passion and scholarship”.
His next work, East Indies (2013), tells the story of the 200 year struggle between the Portuguese Crown, the Dutch East Indies Company and the English East India Company for trade supremacy in the Eastern Seas. The story begins in Malacca, one of the world’s biggest trading ports in the 16th century, documents the founding of Batavia (Jakarta) one of the world’s biggest trading ports in the 17th century and concludes with the founding of Singapore and Hong Kong, some of the world’s biggest trading ports today.

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East Indies — The English East India Company and the Founding of Singapore

Asian Civilizations Museum, Singapore
Friday Evening Lecture Series, 26 September 2014, 7 to 8:30 pm

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Speaker: Ian Burnet – Author

This lecture is based on the speaker’s book ‘East Indies (2013). It follows trade winds and trade routes to the ports across the East Indies and the Orient. It documents the struggles for trade supremacy between the Portuguese Casa da India, the Dutch East Indies Company, and the English East India Company.

The histories of port cities will be discussed, beginning in Malacca, which was one of the world’s largest trading ports in the 16th century, then moving to Batavia – one the world’s largest trading ports in the following two centuries. And finally, to Singapore and Hong Kong, two of the world’s largest trading ports in the 19th century.

About the speaker

Ian Burnet has spent more than 30 years living, working, and travelling in the Indonesian archipelago in his career as a petroleum geologist/geophysicist. He first came in 1968, and was fascinated by the rich history of the archipelago, the spices that grew there, and particularly the roles played by the colonial powers in the history of the islands. His first book, Spice Islands (2011), tells the story of the romance and adventure of the spice trade from Eastern Indonesia over a period of 2000 years. He is currently preparing another book on the history of the Indonesian archipelago.

This lecture is free and co-organised with Friends of the Museums (Singapore). Seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. No registration is required.

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The Long Table Lunch

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The Long Table Lunch, 5 October 12:00pm – 3:00pm, Rondji Restaurant

Join us in a culinary journey across the Indonesian Archipelago. Savour specialities from Sumatra to Ambon as dished up by one of Jakarta’s hottest chefs, Marco Padang, Rondji’s chef Meidy Zuhri, and URWF’s own Janet de Neefe. As you sit back with a view over the Campuhan Ridge rub shoulders with extraordinary authors from the East and relish in a once-in-a-lifetime-meal from the fabled Spice Islands.

FEATURING

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Janet DeNeefe, the Founder & Director of Ubud Writers & Readers Festival, is a Melbourne-born artist, author and restaurateur who has lived in Bali for nearly three decades. Her memoir Fragrant Rice charts her love affair with Balinese food, culture and traditions. Her latest book is Bali: Food of My Island Home.

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Chuah Guat Eng, broke the silence of Malaysian women writing in English in 1994 with her first novel Echoes of Silence. She has since published Tales from the Baram River(2001), a collection of Sarawak Folk Tales retold for children; The old House and Other Stories(2008); a second novel Days of Change(2010) and Dream Stuff(2014), a new collection of short stories.

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Andrew Lam is a writer and cofounder and editor of New American Media, an association of over 2000 ethnic media organisations in the America. Born in Vietnam and coming to the US when he was 11 years old Lam has a Master in Fine Arts from San Francisco State University in creative writing, and a BA degree in biochemistry from UC Berkeley.

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Chef Marco Lim was born in West Sumatra, where he became an expert at the history and creation of Padang cuisine. He is owner and chef of Marco Padang Grill.

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Can Xue was born in Changsa City in Hunan Province, Southern China. In 1957 her father, an editorial director of the New Hunan Daily was condemned as an Ultrarightist and sent to reform through labour, and her mother, who worked at the same newspaper, was sent to the countryside for labour too. Can Xue lost her chance for further education and only graduated from a local elementary school. Can Xue has published numerous short stories and five novels which have all been translated into English.

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Khrishna Udayasankar is the author of The Aryavatar Chronicles
a best selling series of mytho-historical novels that have received critical acclaim, and Objects of Affecton a series of prose-poems that form the story of a relationship seen through the eyes of everyday inanimate objects.

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Ian Burnet has spent 30 years living, working and travelling in Indonesia. Fascinated by the diverse cultures and history of the archipelago, he believed the story of the tiny islands of Ternate and Tidore and their effect on world history needed to be told. His book Spice Islands tells the history, romance and adventure of the spice trade over 2000 years. It has received critical acclaim and has been described as “a wonderful book – a triumph of passion and scholarship”.

The Ubud Writers and Readers Festival is one of the great events on the planet because it incorporates books, ideas, music, dance, food and film all in the village atmosphere of Ubud in Bali. For the full program go to http://www.ubudwritersfestival.com/2014-program/

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A Taste of the Archipelago

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A Taste of the Archipelago
Sunday 5 October 9:00 – 10:15am at the Indus Restaurant

Venture deep into the rich diversity of Indonesian cuisine with these top tastemakers. From one emerald paradise to the next, each of the fabled Spice Islands has a culinary surprise with a fascinating story to match. You’ll leave hungry for more…

FEATURING

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Bondan Winarno was born in Surabaya, East Java, 29 April 1950. He spent most of his career as a writer and journalist. His last position before a voluntary retirement was chief editor of Suara Pembaruan, Jakarta’s evening newspaper. He has written hundreds of columns in the international and national media on the subject of environment, business, social issues and most recently food.

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Janet DeNeefe, the Founder & Director of Ubud Writers & Readers Festival, is a Melbourne-born artist, author and restaurateur who has lived in Bali for nearly three decades. Her memoir Fragrant Rice charts her love affair with Balinese food, culture and traditions. Her latest book is Bali: Food of My Island Home.

MarcoPadang

Chef Marco Lim was born in West Sumatra, where he became an expert at the history and creation of Padang cuisine. He is owner and chef of Marco Padang Grill

Burnet,I_AuthorPhoto4 - Copy

Ian Burnet has spent 30 years living, working and travelling in Indonesia. Fascinated by the diverse cultures and history of the archipelago, he believed the story of the tiny islands of Ternate and Tidore and their effect on world history needed to be told. His book Spice Islands tells the history, romance and adventure of the spice trade over 2000 years. It has received critical acclaim and has been described as “a wonderful book – a triumph of passion and scholarship”.

The Ubud Writers and Readers Festival is one of the great events on the planet because it incorporates books, ideas, music, dance, food and film all in the village atmosphere of Ubud in Bali. For the full program go to http://www.ubudwritersfestival.com/2014-program/

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Sailing the Spice Islands

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The great arc of the Indonesian archipelago starts north of the island of Sumatra and curves south and east until it reaches Papua. This arc of islands is defined by a string of active volcanoes, in Sumatra, Java, Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Flores and Banda, which erupt as the Indian Ocean plate is subducted under the Asian continental plate. Further east, the island arc is pushed to the north by the Australian continent, which has been relentlessly marching northward since it separated from Antarctica 45 million years ago. The continuing collision of the Australian continent and the Pacific Ocean plate has thrust the Papuan mountains up to a height of 5,000 metres above sea level, where a tropical glacier still exists only four degrees south of the equator. The huge Pacific Ocean plate is moving westward pushing the island arc back on itself and rafting segments of Papua hundreds of kilometres towards the west.

Our voyage on the Ombak Putih, a classical two masted Bugis Pinisi, starts in Ambon from where we sailed overnight to the nutmeg islands of Banda. Here we are at the easternmost extension of the island arc before it is cut off by the westward extension of Papua. The Banda islands represent a remnant volcanic crater with the newer volcano of Gunung Api formed in its centre. Some tectonic shift in the continental and oceanic plates occurred in 1988, causing Gunung Api to erupt, sending huge clouds of volcanic ash high into the atmosphere and molten lava to flow down its flanks and into the sea. These black lava flows are still evident as we sail into the sheltered harbour town of Banda Neira.

The Banda Islands

The Banda Islands

Gunung Api in the Banda Islands

Eastern Indonesia represents a unique part of the Earth’s surface because it is here that four of the earth’s great tectonic plates – the Indian Ocean, the Asian Continent, the Australian Continent and the Pacific Ocean – are in collision with each other. Three million years ago in the Moluccan Sea, these powerful forces fused together volcanic island arcs, seafloor sediments and coral reefs to create new land, forming the unusually shaped island of Halmahera. A subduction zone then formed along the western side of Halmahera causing a series of offshore volcanic eruptions.

Our voyage continues north and we are now sailing along the narrow Patinti Strait between the large four-fingered island of Halmahera and a chain of offshore volcanic peaks, which rise directly out of the sea before us. This voyage is one of the most beautiful in all of Indonesia and to make it even more spectacular we are accompanied by a school of dolphins welcoming us by diving out of the crystal clear waters beside our vessel. By mid-morning, the large island of Bacan is receding in our wake and the island of Kayoa lies ahead. Here, we pause to do what few others have done and our group swims across the Equator. Soon the island of Machian is in view, with wisps of cloud starting to build up around its volcanic peak. Machian was once the most prolific producer of cloves in all the Spice Islands and sailors have described how, with the wind in their faces, they could smell its sweet spicy fragrance from far out at sea.

The island is characterized by a central volcano, which has been breached by a large cleft caused by an earlier eruption. The same tectonic event that effected Banda in 1988 also caused the volcano on Machian to erupt explosively and 15,000 islanders were evacuated with some being permanently resettled on the main island of Halmahera.

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The eruption of a volcano on Machian island in 1988

The Ombak Putih lands our group and guides ashore at one village on Machian and we walk along a coastal path for an hour or so until the next village. Walking through plantations of cassava, corn, cloves, nutmeg and coconuts, a particular flower attracts my attention. In my online search to identify the flower, I discovered an unusually named plant called Clitoria Ternatea. This generic name was given by the botanist Breyne in 1678 to describe an exotic plant found growing as a vine on the island of Ternate.

Owing to its similarity to a human body part, it was often used in traditional medicine to treat female sexual ailments and also as an aphrodisiac. The Portuguese, who were the first Europeans to reach Ternate, called it ‘fula criqua’ or the flower of creation, as in human creation. Taken from the northern Moluccas, this exotic cultivar is now grown all over the tropical and sub-tropical world. Commonly called the blue-pea, the butterfly-pea or the cordovan-pea, it is often grown as an ornamental plant —and you may have one in your own garden.

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Our final destination is the twin islands of Ternate and Tidore, which for a millennia were the centre of the clove trade and from the harbour in Ternate we can look back at the volcanoes and our voyage along the Spice Islands.

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The next voyage by the Ombak Putih to the Spice Islands is from October 8-19. There are still a few cabins left so please contact Sea Trek Sailing Adventures for more details at http://www.seatrekbali.com

Fast Facts:

Location: The Maluku Islands are on the Halmahera Plate. They are located east of Sulawesi, west of New Guinea and north and east of Timor. Major islands and island groups include Ambon, Aru, Halmahera, Ternate, Tidore and Seram.

Population: The whole of Maluku Islands have a population of about 2 million people. It is the least populous province in Indonesia. Ambonese-Malay is spoken in most parts of Maluku, with differing dialects and deep roots in Portuguese.

Getting there: Ambon and Ternate are the region’s air hub. Sultan Babullah airport in Ternate and Ambon’s Pattimura airport are served by Lion Air, Batavia Air, Garuda Indonesia Airlines and Sriwijaya Air daily.

Things to do: Banda islands is popular for its breathtaking views on snorkeling and diving excursions, as is the case for most Maluku islands. Great beaches come in abundance in Maluku islands, and it is a mountainous region, therefore hiking is a great activity to enjoy. Eat and drink well with an array of sea food in the islands, and try the famous rujak in Ambon.

Local transportation: On the islands, transportation is provided by bus, minibuses (bemo), taxi or chartered cars. Bicycles and rickshaws are available for the smaller islands. For island hopping, ferries and boats are your best bets.

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Spice Islands — Time for a Celebration!

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It is three years since Spice Islands was first published and it is time for a small celebration — with some bubbles!
In July 2011 I received the advance copies of Spice Islands.
Imagine the excitement of holding the results of so many years of effort in my hands — 200 pages of text with 50 color images — and thanks to Rosenberg Publishing for delivering such high production values.
The reviews were good and how could I forget Brian Geech from the Townsville Bulletin describing Spice Islands as a ‘triumph of passion and scholarship’.
The hardback first edition sold out last year and a second printing in paperback is now available.Spice Islands has also made the transition to e-books and is now available in Kindle and other formats.
It has been a great experience, it lead to the Spice Islands Sailing Adventures and has allowed me to meet so many interesting people.

Cheers!!

For more information please go to http://www.ianburnetbooks.com

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Spice Islands Sailing Adventure — October 2014

The Ombak Putih departs from Ambon on October 8 for 12 days of exploring spice plantations, VOC forts, Sultan’s Palaces, volcanic islands, remote villages, tropical reefs and just relaxing in the pristine waters of the Moluccas in Eastern Indonesia.
Eight of the cabins are already booked, which leaves four cabins and room for eight more voyagers ready to explore the Spice Islands with the tour guides from Sea Trek Sailing Adventures, and historian and author Ian Burnet.

The Ombak Putih is a classical ketch rigged Bugis Pinisi updated with air conditioned cabins and ensuite bathrooms. To enjoy the three minute video from the Spice Islands Sailing Adventure 2013, produced for Sea Trek Sailing Adventures and Ian Burnet Books please follow this link

To see voyage details and booking please go to Sea Trek Sailing Adventures

http://www.seatrekbali.com/cruise/spice-routes-spice-wars/

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