Tag Archives: wallace line

‘Where Australia Collides with Asia’ – Bill Dalton’s Book Review

This ambitious, sweeping history surveys both the cataclysmic shifts of continents and also the lives of some of the world’s greatest scientist-explorers. The story, as told in the book’s Prologue, begins as the Australian land mass breaks away from Antarctica … Continue reading

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Where Australia collides with Asia – An animation of the amazing voyage of Continent Australia

    Continent Australia started to break away from Gondwanaland and Antartica more than 100 million years ago and finally seperated 50 million years ago to make its journey north towards the equator. Continent Australia, which includes Papua-New Guinea slowly … Continue reading

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Mapping where Australia collides with Asia

This map from the University of California, San Diego, shows both height above sea level and depth below sea level. The height above sea level is a direct measurement from NASA altimetry data. The water depth below sea level is … Continue reading

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Explore the Collision of Continents

Reposted with permission from an AIYA blog and my thanks to Lachlan Haycock Prolific writer and historian Ian Burnet has authored numerous books about Indonesia, and has travelled expansively across the archipelago. With the recent release of his latest publication, Where … Continue reading

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‘Where Australia Collides with Asia’ – Jakarta Post book review

Don’t be confused by the title. Ian Burnet’s latest book, Where Australia Collides with Asia is not about the clash of civilizations. It is the story of how continental drift has created the world in which we live, and, in … Continue reading

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‘Where Australia Collides with Asia’ – Book Review by Maximos Russell Darnley

Some historical narratives can be difficult to follow when they are punctuated by countless footnotes and bibliographic references, or broken by a frequent need to delve into appendices. Ian Burnet frees his work from these impediments. By seamlessly embedding his … Continue reading

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